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Majority of British Workers Burned Out At Work, Finds CareerBuilder.co.uk Study
PR Newswire
LONDON

-- 74% of British workers feel burned out in their current job

-- 48% of British workers report higher stress levels since January

-- 51% of British workers say their workload has increased over the last six months

LONDON, July 18, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- As unemployed workers contend with a highly competitive job market, the post-recession workplace norm of smaller staffs, longer hours and increased workloads is taking its toll on those currently employed. Seventy-four per cent of British workers say they feel burnout in their current job with more than one-in-ten stating they feel burned out all the time. Nearly half (48%) say their stress levels have increased over the last six months. Fifty-one per cent of British workers say they have seen an increase in their workloads since the beginning of 2012, with 10 per cent saying it has greatly increased. The survey of more than 400 British employees was conducted by Consumer Analysis Limited in June 2012.

"The economic challenges in the UK and across Europe have forced businesses to try to maintain pre-recession productivity levels with much leaner staffs," said Tony Roy, President of CareerBuilder EMEA.  "The pressure to do more with less has impacted workplace morale, and companies are likely to face increased turnover and the loss of top performers once the economy improves." 

While 71 per cent of British workers say they feel loyal to their current employer, 41 per cent feel they are overqualified for the job the currently have and 40 per cent say they are likely to change jobs in the next 12 months.

How does the UK compare to France and Germany?

Looking at the three largest markets in Europe, British workers were the most likely to report feeling overqualified for their current jobs and are the most likely to change jobs in the next 12 months.  French workers were the most likely to report feeling burnout all the time and seeing workloads increase over the last six months.  German workers were the most likely to report higher stress levels, but also feel the most loyalty to their current employer. 

  • Workers always feeling burn out in their current job -- 13% British, 19% French, 9% German
  • Workers reporting higher stress levels since January -- 48% British, 52% French, 53% German
  • Workers reporting their workload increased over the last six months -- 51% British, 56% French, 51% German
  • Workers saying they feel loyal to their current employer -- 71% British, 67% French, 86% German
  • Workers feeling overqualified for the job the currently have -- 41% British, 30% French, 38% German
  • Workers saying they are likely to change jobs in the next 12 months -- 40% British, 35% French, 30% German

Survey Methodology

There were more than 400 employees aged 18-70 from the UK involved in our survey. In lengthy online interviews they were asked questions about their current job situation and their experiences in the workplace.

People were interviewed online using the latest polling techniques and the highest quality of panel in order to gain the most reliable results, and to probe people's opinions. Random sampling methods were used and checks were put in place to ensure the closest possible representation of national opinion, given the interviewee qualification criteria.

The fieldwork was carried out during June 2012.

About CareerBuilder.co.uk

CareerBuilder UK is one of the most visited online job sites in the United Kingdom. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc (NYSE: GCI), Tribune Company, and The McClatchy Company (NYSE: MNI), CareerBuilder.co.uk powers the career centres for hundreds of UK sites that reach national, local, industry and niche audiences. For more information about CareerBuilder products and services, visit http://www.careerbuilder.co.uk.

Media Contact:

For more information, or to speak to a spokesperson from CareerBuilder.co.uk, contact Kate Baker (katebaker@bottlepr.co.uk) or Antonia Taylor (antoniataylor@bottlepr.co.uk) at BOTTLE – 01865 882988.